Portishead Parish Magazines.

 

 

 

1873. September.

 

 

The time has again come round when it is possible to place before the readers of the Parish Magazine a statement of the results of the various annual Inspections and Examinations of the parish Schools that have taken place at various intervals during the spring. These results, it must be admitted on all hands, are highly satisfactory, and fully prove that the schools in question are doing their work efficiently and well.

 

The first to be chronicled, because the first in order of time, is the visit of the District Diocesan Inspector, the Rev. W. B. de Moleyns, who commenced his inspection of our schools on Thursday, Feb. 20th. Our youngest born, the little school in connection with St. Barnabas` Church, had first to stand the fire of official inspection and scrutiny; and right well it stood the ordeal. This was the first time this school had been inspected after a full years work; as, on the occasion of the Rev. W. Michell`s visit, in the preceding April, it had only been opened about ten months. It is very creditable, therefore, to Miss King, the mistress, and must be very satisfactory to all concerned, that, in addition to the favourable report given below, the result of the Inspector`s visit to this school on this occasion, was, that the prize annually given by the Chew Decanal Schoolmasters Union to ` The best small School in the Deanery`, was awarded to this school on this the very first year that it could possibly have gain it.

 

The same gentleman also inspected the two older schools of the parish-the National and Infants Schools-on the following day, Friday, February 21st, with results, as will appear from the following Reports:

 

Inspectors Report of the Portishead Schools, visited Feb. 20th and 21st, 1873.

 

Feb 20th St. Barnabas` School.- A nice new school doing a good work in the locality. Mistress earnest and painstaking. Very neat healthy children, who answered intelligently on religious subjects.

 

Feb 21st Infant School.- I was much gratified at finding this school considerably enlarged, and in the hands of a new teacher who works with skill and energy. The children answered well, and are healthy and cheerful. The managers` efforts and pains have already met with ample return.

 

Feb 21st National School.- This is decidedly a good school. The master and his wife and the monitors all working together well and industriously. The answers to the questions set on paper show careful grounding in Bible and Prayer-Book knowledge.

W. B. DE MOLEYNS,

`District Inspector of Schools`.

 

The one aim and object of this inspection it should be borne in mind, was, not merely to test the accuracy with which the children are taught `the three R`s` and all branches of purely secular instruction, but what is of vastly superior importance-to ascertain how far instruction in religious knowledge had been attended to. This fact will doubtless, greatly enhance the satisfaction with which the above reports will be read both by the parents of the children and by subscribers to the school. The sad necessities of political strife having forced the Queen`s Government to withdraw all branches of religions instruction from the care and supervision of the Government Inspectors, it is a matter of much congratulation that in the old system of District Inspectors, supplemented and strengthened by the appointment of one paid Diocesan Inspector, machinery was found ready at hand by which it was possible to take up at once and carry on, throughout this Diocese at least, the important work that was sacrificed and abandoned. And as Government Inspection is now confined to secular subjects, Diocesan Inspection has been in turn wisely with-drawn from that domain altogether, and concentrated wholly on religious subjects.

 

The examination of those children of the National School who have been instructed in the elements of drawing, took place on Thursday, March 6th,

being conducted as usual by the managers of the school by means of examination papers sent down from London. The results of this examination, compared with those of last year, as stated in the August number of the Parish Magazine, 1872, show not only that this branch of instruction is very much appreciated both by parents and by children, but also that the efforts of teachers in this direction have been energetic and successful. Thirty-one children are reported to have `given satisfactory evidence of having been taught drawing`; while out of that number sixteen as been named as having shown either `proficiency` or `excellence` in one or more of the subjects in which they were examined. Those who have shown `proficiency` are marked `P` and those who have shown excellence are marked `E`, in the following table. The latter had thus entitled themselves to the prizes set against their names, which were sent down from London in due course, and publicly given to the owners at the annual School Treat last month. This was exclusively a `first grade` examination.

 

 

Subject of Examination.

Name

 

Freehand

Geometry

Model

Prizes

Ashford

William

----

P

----

----

Bessant

Ellen

P

----

----

----

Burston

William

E

----

----

Drawing Board

Dobbs

Elizabeth

P

----

----

----

Gale

Alfred

P

E

----

Compasses

Jenkins

Frank

----

P

----

----

Landman

Kate

E

 

----

Drawing Board

Lesser

William

P

E

----

Compasses

Lovell

Albert

P

----

----

----

May

William C

----

----

E

Colours

Mitchell

Eliz. Jane

P

----

----

----

Phelps

Martha

P

----

----

----

Pyne

Hurbert

----

E

----

Compasses

Smith

William J

E

P

----

Drawing Board

Sprules

Matilda

P

----

----

----

Summers

Emma

E

----

----

----

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to the above, this year has witnessed what it may be hoped will prove but the first of another series of annual examinations in the parish. Mr and Mrs Thelbridge having both obtained certificates in drawing, and thus qualified themselves to conduct an Art night school in connection with and under the sanction of the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, held drawing classes accordingly in the National Schoolroom, on two or three evenings of the week during last winter, for the instruction of pupils over thirteen years of age in the `second grade`, Although these classes were not attended so numerously as might have been hoped, still enough was done both to reward the teachers for their past exertions and to encourage more to join the classes during the coming winter. In accordance with arrangements made for that purpose by the Science and Art Department, the work done in these classes during the season was tested by means of an examination, which took place on the evenings of the 1st and 2nd of May. It is much to be regretted, however, both for their own sakes, as well as for the sake and credit of their teachers, that several of the most regular and efficient members of the classes were unable to be present on the days of examination, having either left the parish altogether, or being temporarily away at work elsewhere. But for this circumstance, there is little doubt that the following table would have contained a record of the success of several others, in addition to those whose names appear in it. In this case, according to the explanation given on the printed form of the department, `P` signifies `Pass` and `E` Excellent.` A student obtaining the latter being entitled to a prize.

 

Nature of Examination

Name

 

Age

Free

hand

Geome

-try

Perspec

-tive

Model

Prize

Bindon

Wm. P

15

---

---

---

P

 

Bliss

Joseph

15

---

---

---

P

 

Creed

Fred. G

13

---

E

P

---

B. L. P

May

Wm. C

14

P

---

---

E

D.B.etc

Smith

Wm. J

14

---

P

---

---

 

 

 

B.L.P.= Burchett`s Linear Perspective.

D.B. = Drawing Board.

 

It may be stated here that Mr and Mrs Thelbridge propose to re-commence these classes in the National Schoolroom on the third week in October,-on Tuesday and Thursday, from 7 to 9 o` clock; when it is to be hoped that many more will avail themselves of the opportunity thus afforded them of turning their long winter evenings to so profitable an account.

 

The Rev. H. B. Barry, Her Majesty`s Inspector, commenced his annual inspection of our schools on Thursday, May 15, visiting St. Barnabas` School on the morning of that day, and the National School in the afternoon; the inspection of the Infant School being unavoidably postponed till Wednesday, the 28th of the same month. The reports which are given below were received in course of time, and are (under the circumstances) reasonably satisfactory; but the fact that in the case of two out of the three schools the Grant claimable on the results of the examination exceeded by 2 3s, the amount that the rules of the department would allow them to receive, and only fell short of that amount by six shillings in the case of the third, is (to say the least) a far more significant testimony to their efficiency than the calm and impassive language of the official reports.

 

Summary of H.M.Inspector`s report on the Portishead C.E. Schools, inspected May 15th and 28th, 1873.

 

National School. `The school is under good influence, carefully taught, and making on the whole satisfactory progress. The reading in the upper standards should be more distinct and audible.`

 

St. Barnabas` School. `The young children in this small school are neat and orderly, and carefully taught.`

 

Infants` School. `A classroom has been built. The school is orderly, carefully taught, and making satisfactory progress, considering the time the certificated mistress has been in charge. Desks are wanted`.

 

The amount of Grant allowed and received in each case, was as follows:-

 

s d

National School 71 14 0

St. Barnabas` School 17 5 0

Infant School (for 7 months) 20 19 8

 

 

Yet one more Examination remains to be recorded. In accordance with the provisions of the Diocesan School Prize Scheme, an Examination in Religious subjects was held simultaneously through out the Diocese, on Saturday, May 17th, in all schools that choose to complete for prizes open respectively,

(a)  to the whole Diocese,

(b)  to each Archdeaconry,

(c)  to each Rural Deanery.

 

 

This examination (entirely on paper) was conducted in the following

manner: Teachers were invited to select from their schools one-fourth of the number of children on the books of 8yrs and over. These, as will be seen from the table below, were arranged in four divisions according to the age of the children selected; each division being supplied with printed examination papers prepared by the Diocesan Inspector, of greater or less difficulty in proportion to age.

 

The children`s written answers to these papers were forwarded to the Diocesan Inspector for examination and classification according to a pre-arranged system of marks. The result of this examination was most honourable to the schools of this Deanery,-Wrington Boys School being awarded the very first prize in the whole Diocese; Burrington School gaining the first prize in the Archdeaconry of Bath; while the prize for the best school under a master in this (Portishead) Rural Deanery, fell (these two being thus disqualified) to the lot of our own National School; and to have come in third in such circumstances may well be considered fully as creditable as to have taken first place in another Deanery.

 

 

The names and ages of the children selected by Mr Thebridge from amongst his scholars to contend for the honour of their school, who thus gained so much credit for him and for themselves, are given below; and if they will but put in practice henceforth what they have learnt at school, it may safely be predicted of them that their future live will be happy and pleasant to themselves, creditable to their school, and useful to all connected with them.

 

 

Div.

No.

Name

 

Age.

A

I

Fanny

Phelps

8

---

2

Fanny

Offer

8

---

3

Elizabeth

Tripp

9

---

4

Edwin

Creed

9

---

5

John

Dalrymple

9

---

6

Mary Ann

Atherton

8

B

7

Martha

Phelps

10

---

8

Matilda

Sprules

10

---

9

Mary Ann

Mayo

11

---

10

Elizabeth

Derrick

11

---

11

Albert

Gale

10

---

12

Philip

Mayo

10

C

13

Elizabeth

Mitchell

12

---

14

Kate

Landman

12

---

15

Mary

Tripp

12

---

16

Alfred

Gale

12

---

17

William

Burston

13

D

18

Emma

Summers

14

---

19

Jane

Bear

14

---

20

William

Smith

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It should also be stated, in proof that the more homely branches of instruction are by no means neglected in our schools, that two of the needlework prizes, offered by the Chew and Portishead Decanal School-masters Union were brought within this Parish-the prize for `piecing` falling to the National School, and the second `patchwork` prize being awarded to St. Barnabas` School.

 

 

 

 

Parish Registers.

 

1872

Baptisms

 

Dec.22 Francis James, son of Charles and Ruth Hodges.

29th Annie, daughter of Stephen and Emma Bessant.

29th Frederick, son of George and Jane Parkin.

29th George Edward, son of Peter and Mary Ann Hathrell.

1873

Jan 2nd Beatrice, daughter of George Francis and Isabella Adelaide

Morant, Down Cottage.

9th Grace Harwood, daughter of James and Louisa Ariel Stewart.

18th Samuel Francis Abel, son of Samuel and Sarah Parker,

(privately.)

26th Arthur, son of Charles and Ann Tripp.

26th Harriet, Daughter of Charles and Hester Cann.

Feb 23rd Alice Mary, daughter of William George and Mary Anne Pearce.

Mar 2nd Henry Herbert, son of Henry and Emma Rowe.

7th William, son of William and Elizabeth Lee.

7th Arthur, son of William and Elizabeth Lee.

7th Sarah Anne, daughter of William and Elizabeth Lee.

19th John Henry, son of Francis and Sarah Osmond.

30th Alice Amelia, daughter of Charles and Harriet Goldstone.

30th Ellen, daughter of Samuel James and Mary Ann Dyer.

30th William Charles, son of John Hardwick and Agnes Dalrymple.

April 27th Arthur James, son of William and Ann Davis.

27th William James, son of James and Elizabeth Derrick.

27th William Charles, son of Henry Charles and Emma Jane

Moody.

27th Thomas Henry, son of William and Harriet Clara Hanney.

May 4th Richard James, son of George and Elizabeth Hunt.

25th Alice Mary, daughter of Walter and Mary Dingham.

25th Ellen, daughter of William and Emma Poole.

25th Maria, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Rossiter.

June 1st Herbert William, son of John and Sarah Ann Woolford.

15th Charles, son of Charles and Eliza Jane Davis (privately).

22nd Thomas Charles, son of Thomas Rowe and Sarah Elizabeth

Townsend (privately).

26th George Roubiliac Hodges, son of Peter Nugent Hodges and

Gwendoline Celeste Amelia Louisa Nugent.

29th William John, son of John and Mary Jane March.

29th Polly Jane, daughter of David and Mary Ann John.

29th Elizabeth Carolina, daughter of James Henry and Charlotte

Rawlings.

July 8th Amy Harriet, daughter of Arthur George and Jane Heaven.

12th Francis Louisa, daughter of Ralph Entwistle and Harriet Rosa

Peters.

27th Ada Ellen, daughter of James and Elizabeth Weaver.

Aug 3rd William John, son of John and Jane Woolfe.

Sept 20th James Herbert, son of James Joseph and Hannah Collins

(privately)

28th Lewis John, son of Joseph John and Sarah Eliza Ware.

28th Victoria Kate, daughter of George and Sophia Victoria Gregory.

28th Robert John, son of Albert and Elizabeth Andrews.

28th Laura Kate, daughter of Charles and Lucy Ann Kitchen.

28th Florence Mary, daughter of Samuel and Jane Harris.

Oct 7th Francis James, son of Sidney Hill and Emma Spiller (privately)

16th Herbert James, son of George and Hannah Sawtell (privately)

20th Dorothy Francis Mary, daughter of John and Augusta Mary

Hardwick.

26th Frederick William, son of William and Mary Ann Tripp.

26th Eliza, daughter of Henry and Sophia Bartley.

Nov 2nd Alice, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Jane Hunt.

2nd Florence, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Jane Hunt.

9th Albert Roland John, son of Thomas Wiggall and Emily Hill.

Dec 7th Ada Elizabeth, daughter of William and Emily Tuck.

7th William Seaward, son of Richmond and Emma Candy.

Dec 28th Henry Alvis, son of Joseph and Louisa Ashford.

28th George Henry, son of Thomas Lilley and Rhoda Blake.

28th Amelia Francis, daughter of John and Ellen Bacon.

 

Marriages

 

Mar 12th. William Hancock, stoker, H.M.S. `Fervant` to Elizabeth Ann

Roberts, Portishead.

30th John Coles to Elizabeth Stokes of Portishead.

June 1st Joseph Crane, of Portbury, to Hannah Parsons, of Portishead.

2nd Walter James Parker, to Mary Churches, both of Portishead.

5th Samuel Eyres, Grocer, of Clifton, to Ellen Chisnall, of Portishead.

18th William Henry Jones, Schoolmaster, of Bristol, to Ellen

Doswell, of Portishead.

Sept 2nd Isaac Hall, of Portishead, to Mary Ann Mitchell, of Portishead.

Nov 6th Henry Albert Hall, of Sydney, Australia, to Louisa Sarah, second

daughter of Dr. Wigan, of Clarence House, Portishead.

Dec 25th Eli Buttle, of Portishead, to Emma Holloway, of Portishead.

Burials

 

Jan 18th Mary Ann Halliday, aged 54 years.

Feb 8th Charles Brown, B.T.S. `Formidable`, aged 14 years.

28th Charles Pearce of Rose Hill Villa, Portishead, Major in the

Bengal Army, aged 83 years.

Mar 8th Daniel Dodd, aged 6 months.

28th William Tuck, aged 86 years.

April 27th Oliver James Gale, aged 10 months.

May 4th William Wybourne, aged 75 years.

7th (In the Friends Burial Ground) Emma Maria Dawes, aged 42

years.

9th John Newton, of Slade Farm, aged 64 years.

June 25th Catherine Harriet Stanton Martin, aged 52 years.

July 13th Thomas Charles Townsent, aged three months.

22nd John Ashford, aged 69 years.

23rd Bertha Biss, aged 1 year.

26th Elizabeth Addis, aged 63 years.

Aug 4th Charles Edward Plenty, aged 4days.

9th Eleanor Harptree, aged 78 years.

17th Joseph Henry Patrick, aged 21 years.

Sept 3rd Sarah Harris, aged 87 years.

20th Marian Perrott, aged 25 years.

20th Emily Kate Biddle, aged 6 months.

21st Anne Russell Shepstone, aged 16 years.

21st William Pocock, aged 56 years.

Oct 14th William Springer, aged 43years.

21st Henry Gale, aged 47 years.

22nd Alice Mary Pearce, aged 9 months.

Nov 4th Jane Lesser, aged 36 years.

4th Annie Garland, aged 10 years.

20th William Ainsworth (of Bristol), aged 38 years.

20th Matilda Martha Whatley, Plantagent Villa, aged 53 years.

23rd Charles Fry, aged 40 years.

24th Henry Atherton (of Weston in Gordano), aged 31 years.

30th James Herbert Collins, aged 11 weeks.

Dec 1st Elizabeth Bridges, Carisbrooke, aged 73 years.

3rd Charles Davis, aged 13 months.

3rd Thirza Davis, aged 56 years.

7th Fred Blake, aged 2 years.

16th Lavinia Annie Wyatt, aged 4years.

Dec 27th William Bear, Chief Officer, B.T.S. Formidable, aged 47 years.

28th Jesse Daniel Badman, aged 64 years.

30th William E. L. Eastwood, aged 6 years.

 

 

 

Parish Matters.

 

There have been two Vestry Meetings in the vestry room of the parish church this spring, both duly summoned and legally held, at neither of which did the attendance exceed seven persons.

 

The first was held on the 26th of March, for the purpose-according to the terms of the notice, of `electing Overseers, Guardian, Waywarden, and Constable for the ensuing year;` and it may even be news to one of the gentleman named to read that he was elected by the Vestry, together with others, as a fit and proper person to serve the office of Overseer.

 

The following is the substance of the entries made in the minute book by the chairman:

 

Messrs. Thomas Ashford, William May, George Gilford, and William Tuck, jun. were named by the Vestry as fit and proper persons to serve the office of Overseer. Mr. S. V. Davis was again nominated Guardian, and Mr. John E. Newton was re-elected Way-warden. No constable was chosen.

 

A resolution was also proposed, seconded, and carried unanimously, requesting the chairman, in the name of the Vestry, to petition the Bedminster Board of Guardians to apply to the Poor Law Board to grant a second Guardian for the Parish of Portishead, on account of the large and continued increase of the population and rateable value of the parish.

 

The second Vestry meeting was duly summoned for and held on Easter Monday, April 14th, `to examine the Churchwardens accounts for the past year, and to appoint Churchwardens for the year ensuing`.

 

The Churchwardens accounts showed that the Church expense amounted during the past year to 70 2s 5d, or about 10 more than the estimated ordinary expenditure. This large increase was accounted for by the fact that it had been necessary to undertake, during the year, considerable repairs in connection with the bells, the stocks, bearings, and clappers of which were in most cases in an unsafe state. The cost of these repairs amounted to about 10, of which not only swallowed up the very small balance of the previous year, but left a deficiency at the end of this last year of 8 14s 0. The accounts were duly passed; and the retiring Churchwardens, Mr. John Fisher, J.P. and Mr. John Pearce, were re-appointed to their respective offices.

 

 

 

Parish Movements.

 

June 1873.

 

Working Men`s Reading and Coffee Rooms.

It may be remembered that an attempt was made, some eighteen months ago, to start a Working Men`s Club and Reading Room in the parish, which promised at first to be immediately and completely successful, and only failed at last on account of the difficulty of finding a house or rooms suitable for the purpose. That difficulty is now, however, in a fair way of being surmounted, and the practicability and expediency of the above-mentioned attempt about to be put to the test on a small scale.

 

Chiefly through the energy and exertion of a lady interested in the parish, a small house has been taken in the village, nearly opposite Mr. Young`s shop, which it is proposed to open at once under the title of `Portishead Working Men`s Reading and Coffee Rooms`. The house will contain a room, or shop, for the sale of tea, coffee, and cocoa; and a Reading Room, which will be supplied with newspapers, magazines, chess, and draughts, etc. No subscription will be required for admission to the Coffee Room; but a subscription of 2d. per week, or 1s.6d. per quarter, must be paid in advance for admission to the Reading Room, in connection with which there will be a small smoking-room and lending library.

 

Honorary members may also obtain admission to the Reading Room on payment of a subscription of 3s. per quarter.

The house will be under the management of Mr. and Mrs Tritton, who will keep a list of weekly and quarterly subscribers and see that the rules and regulations of the house are attended to. The house will be open every day, except Sunday, from an early hour till 10 p.m.

 

Should this experiment succeed, it will be comparatively easy to advance afterwards to something on a larger scale; but to succeed it must be promptly and warmly supported by those who wish it success. It is earnestly hoped, therefore, that all true friends of the movement will come forward at once in its support, and become ordinary or honorary members of the `Portishead Working Men`s Reading and Coffee Rooms`.

 

N.B. A Mothers` Meeting will be held in one of the rooms of the house, on every Tuesday Afternoon, from 2.30 to 4 p.m.

 

The Sale of Work at the Flower Show;

 

The Annual Flower Show is fixed this year for Thursday, the 14th of August. There will be as usual, a sale of work in a tent on the ground during the afternoon, the proceeds of which it is proposed to devote (with the sanction of the Vestry) towards defraying the expenses of the introduction of gas into the Parish Church.

 

Now that the population of the village has increased so largely, and with the prospect of so many strangers residing amongst us for the next two or three years, it is very undesirable that the Parish Church should remain closed during all the long winter evenings.

 

A cheerful and hearty service in our fine old Church, well lighted up, on a Sunday or Week-day evening during the winter, may reasonably be hoped to prove not only attractive, but a means also of much help and blessing to many. It is earnestly requested, therefore, that all who can sympathise with the object in view will either in the shape of useful or fancy articles for sale (together with the work of the Ladies` Working Association), on the Flower Show Day, or in the form of subscriptions afterwards, to make up whatever further sum may be required.

 

The New Church Hymn Book.

 

The following brief statement will show the result of the plan (as explained in the April number of this Magazine), adopted for the purpose of supplying the two churches and choirs with the number of Hymn-Books required for public use.

 

On Monday, May 5th (when the arrangement came to an end), Hymn-Books had been sold, at the several shops where they had been offered for sale, to the undermentioned amounts;

 

 

- s - d

 

By Mr. Bond 1 6 0

Mr. Gilford 18 0

Mr. Osmond 3 13 7

Mr. Picton 7 0 3

Mr. Stewart 2 19 9

Miss Walter 2 10 1

Messrs. J & S Wedmore 3 15 5

22 3 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sum arising as discount on the above total amount, and available therefore for the purpose above named, was exactly 5 10s 9d, and has been laid out as follows;

 

 

 

s d

Twelve copies of the 4s. edition, with tunes and chants for

the use of the Parish Church choir, discount price; 1 16 0

The same for St. Barnabas` Church choir; 1 16 0

Covering the above 24 books, material and work; 4 9

Two copies of the organists edition, discount price; 11 3

Books for public use in Parish Church, discount price; 9 0

Books for public use in St. Barnabas` Church, discount price; 9 0

Balance towards carriage of parcels; 4 9

5 10 9

 

 

 

 

 

The thanks of the parish are thus largely due to those who by kindly offering the books for sale in their shops have contributed to render so easily and readily available in our case the liberal offer made by the publishers to all parishes about to introduce the `Hymnal Companion` into their Church Services.

 

Portishead Cricket Club.

 

The club meets for practice on Tuesday evenings, at 6 p.m. and on Saturday afternoons, at 3 p.m. on their ground near the Tower Farm.

Mr. J. R. Thelbridge, Hon Sec, will be glad to receive the names of any desirous of joining the club. Visitors to Portishead can join the club on payment of the subscription of 3s.

 

 

 

 

Portishead Parish Magazine.

 

1874 October.

 

There is no one, therefore, in the parish of Portishead, it is hoped, who has not already heard all about it, who will not now learn with pride and pleasure how much credit has been gained by, and how much success has fallen to the lot of, the Parish Schools, as the results of the several annual examinations they have been subjected to during the last six months. Parents and subscribers at least cannot fail to feel satisfied,- the one that their children are reaping all the advantages they can reasonably desire for them, and the others that they are giving their money and their support to no purpose. But to the business in hand;---

 

Instead of taking them in the order in which they occurred, for the sake of giving a better and clearer idea of them, we will take the several examinations and inspections of the year under the three following heads;

first, Religious Instruction;

secondly, Secular Instruction;

thirdly, Drawing.

 

And under the first head of `Religious Instruction`, we come at once to the first event of the year, the annual examination in religious knowledge, conducted this year by the Diocesan Inspector in person, the Rev. W. Mitchell, who paid his second visit to the parish on the 24th of February last, and sent in the following Reports on the 20th of the next month:=

 

The Diocesan Inspector`s Reports of the Portishead Schools, visited Feb. 24th, 1874.

 

`National School`- This School has considerable increased in numbers during the last two years, without losing any of its efficiency. It is admirably organised and instructed; the discipline is good, and the children, by oral answers and written composition, as well as in repetition, generally acquitted themselves with great credit.

 

`St. Barnabas` School.- Several new comers caused the Infant Class to appear wanting in discipline. Many, however, of the infants answered fairly, and some among the elders exceedingly well; most of them creditably. Repetition, tone, and discipline, generally satisfactory.

 

`Infants` School.- Infants very nicely taught, and in excellent order. Quite satisfactory throughout.

 

Accompanying these reports there was in each case a table showing the degree of merit which the Inspector assigned to the several classes in each school in the various branches of religious instruction in which he examined them, e.g. Old Testament, New Testament, catechism, prayer-book, hymns, etc. It is unfortunate that these tables cannot, for want of space, be inserted here in full, as they would give so good an idea both of the systemic thoroughness with which the examination was conducted, and also of the very satisfactory manner in which the schools stood the test. It must be sufficient, however to give here a general explanation and summary of them. After examining a class in any given subject, the Inspector immediately registered the result in its place in the table by means of one of the following marks, according to the degree of merit or demerit the examination showed. If the result was very good , V.G. was entered in the table; if only good, G.; if not quite reaching that standard, but still fair, F., if but moderate, M.; and if bad, B. Taking the three schools together, there were 58 separate and distinct subjects of examination on which the Inspector thus registered his opinion, with the following very gratifying total results: V.G., 33; G., 21; F., 3; M., 1; B., 0. This needs no further comment.

 

This, however, was not the only test to which the efficiency of the religious instruction, imparted to the children was subjected. Both the National School and St. Barnabas` School competed this year in the examination held simultaneously through out the diocese, in accordance with the provisions of the Diocesan Prize Scheme, on Saturday, the 16th of May. The nature and object of this examination were fully explained in the September number of the parish Magazine last year; and it will be sufficient to say here concerning it, therefore, that in all competing schools one-fourth of the number of the children on the books over eight years of age are selected to be examined on behalf of their school, and are supplied on the day of examination with printed papers of questions of greater or less difficulty, according to their age. These papers, when worked out and answered, are sent in to be examined, and classified according to merit, by examiners especially appointed for the purpose; the average number of marks thus assigned to the competing children in each school being taken to represent the comparative merit of the school itself.

 

The result of this examination, as far as our schools were concerned, was, that out of 530 schools (departments) in the diocese, 97 of which competed in this examination. The National School stood in the eleventh place, with an average of 98 marks; while St. Barnabas` School, though much lower down, yet stood in the creditable position of forty-fourth, or considerably more, than half way up the list of completing schools. Both Mr. Thebridge and Miss King thus became entitled to a prize of 2 from the Chew Decanal Schoolmasters Union; the one for ` the best school under a master` and the other for `the best school with less than 28 children on the books over eight years of age`, in the united deanery of Chew and Portishead.

 

Our own National School being thus eleventh in the diocese, it may be interesting to know the names of the first ten. They are as follows, in the order mentioned, according to the average number of marks gained by each:

 

1. Burrington, 139; 2. Bath Union, 130;

3. Bath Blue School, Girls, 125 ; 4. Bath Octagon, 114;

5. Wrington, Girls, 112; 6. Wrington, Boys, 111;

7. Bath Blue School, Boys, 110; 8. Whatley, 107;

9. Long Sutton, 103; 10. Aller,100.

 

It will be thus seen that although, as before mentioned, the prize for the best school under a master` in the deanery was awarded to our National School, it was in reality only fourth in the deanery, the other three being disqualified for that prize by having taken a higher prize either this year or last,- Burrington School being adjudged the best Boy`s School in the whole diocese this year (the proud position occupied by Wrington Boy`s School last year), and Wrington Girl`s School obtaining the same high honour amongst all the Girl`s Schools in the diocese this year. And seeing, therefore, that this deanery contains the best Boy`s and the best Girl`s School in the whole diocese this year, as well as the champion Boy`s School of last year, it can be considered no discredit to our own school to come in but fourth in the deanery under such circumstances,- a position of much higher honour, indeed, as well as of much higher merit, as the marks testify, than in the first place in most other deaneries. And, before passing on, it may be worth while to point to the single successes gained last year and this year by schools in this deanery, as clearly evidencing the good work that has been accomplished by the Chew Decanal Schoolmaster`s Union, which has been in existence now for many years, and which has thus proved itself well worthy of the support which it needs and asks for. It is earnestly to be hoped that this will be borne in mind when next the subscription-book goes its rounds on its behalf.

 

But let us by no means forget that honour is due in another quarter also. If these results are to be traced in the end to the energy and efficiently of the teachers, they certainly could not have been reached without application and willingness on the part of the taught; and the teachers surely will be the last to grudge their need of praise to those children who rightly regarded it as an honour and a privilege to be chosen to complete for their schools in this examination, and who willingly gave up the whole of that fine Saturday holiday in May for that purpose. All honour to them! Right willing champions they showed themselves to be, as with stout hearts, but weary inky little fingers, they stuck perseveringly to their papers to the last, and found in no cases that many of the questions which at first sight puzzled and frightened them so much, when looked at fairly, and thought about quietly, were not so hard after all. May they remember and profit by the lesson through life, as often as they are called upon (as surely they will be) to test and put in practice on the broader rougher stage of the world the truths and principles they have been taught at school.

 

The names and marks gained by these chosen champions of their respective schools may be seen in the following tables. The divisional letters show the age of the children, division A including those between 10 and 12; C, those between12 and 14; and D, those above 14.

 

 

Div.

Name

Marks

Results

National School

 

 

A

Amelia Gale

39

------

"

Alice Brown

60

Pass

"

Mary Ann Atherton

124

First Class

"

Fanny Phelps

114

Commended

"

Fanny Offer

172

First Class

"

Albert Lesser

51

-----

B

Mary Ann Gale

118

Commended

"

Elizabeth Tripp

91

Commended

"

Ellen Bessant

83

Commended

"

Emma Smith

81

Commended

"

Ellen Patch

100

Commended

"

Matilda Sprules

126

First Class

"

Martha Phelps

143

First Class

"

Elizabeth Derrick

106

Commended

"

Alfred Lesser

62

Pass

"

Edwin Creed

89

Commended

"

William Bear

95

Commended

"

Albert Gale

95

Commended

"

Alfred Allison

148

First Class

"

Arthur William Gale

61

Pass

"

Philip Mayo

70

Pass

"

Tom Crisp

117

Commended

C

Elizabeth Davis

86

Commended

"

Mary Ann Mayo

81

Commended

"

Kate Landman

98

Commended

"

Elizabeth Mitchell

147

First Class

D

William Burston

89

Commended

St. Barnabas` School

 

 

A

Lucy Vowles

47

-----

"

Rosa Pomphrey

81

Commended

"

Mary Brown

38

-----

"

Lucy Stokes

70

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupil-Teachers and Monitors.

 

Rank

Name

Marks

Result

 

National School

 

 

P.T.

James Gale, 2nd year

99

Commended

P.T.

F.G.Creed, 1st year

159

First Class

M

Alice Way

97

Commended

St. Barnabas`School

 

 

M

Ellen Willmott

64

Pass

 

Infants School

 

 

P.T.

Elizabeth Smith, 3rd year

86

Commended

 

The following were also awarded prizes in connection with the same examination:- By the Diocesan Inspector,-

 

Frederick George Creed, pupil teacher, first year;

Elizabeth Mitchell, division C;

Fanny Offer, division A.

 

By the Chew Decanal Schoolmasters Union;

 

F.G. Creed, pupil teacher, first year;

Fanny Offer, division A;

Elizabeth Mitchell, extra prize.

 

Passing on now to `Secular Instruction`. In the only branch of secular instruction to which our Schoolmasters Union still continues to give its attention, needlework, out of thirteen prizes offered by the Union for proficiency in the different branches of this most necessary part of female education, two were awarded to the schools of this parish; Mrs Thelbridge carrying off the second prize for `Frocks for Children of two years,` and Miss Vowles, of the Infant School, gaining the second patchwork prize, which last year fell to the lot of St. Barnabas` School. These successes may be again pointed to, therefore, in proof that the more homely and useful branches of instruction are by no means neglected in our schools.

 

And now we come to that which is certainly the most formidable and anxious, if not the most important event of the whole year: the annual examination conducted by Her Majesty`s Inspector, the Rev, H.B. Barry, who visited the National School and St. Barnabas on Friday, May 1st, and the Infants School on the following Friday, May 8th.

 

Summary of H.M. Inspector`s Reports on the Portishead C. E. Schools, inspected May 1st and 8th 1874:-

 

 

 

 

National School.-

The School has increased in numbers, is under good influence, and making on the whole satisfactory progress. Military drill has been introduced.

 

St. Barnabas` School.-

This School is orderly, and carefully taught.

 

Infant`s School.-

This School is orderly, well taught and making satisfactory progress.

 

Shortly after the receipt of these reports, Miss King and Miss Vowles, having each been twice inspected in their present schools with satisfactory results, received their full certificates from the Education Department.

 

The amount of Grant allowed and received on account of these three schools, was as follows:-

--s--d

National School 91-10-0

St. Barnabas` School 23 - 6-0

Infants` School 38 - 4-0

 

The only point that can require further remark or explanation here is that which is alluded to at the end of the above report on the National School. The Education Department having allowed and encouraged managers of schools to set apart one hour per week for instruction in drill, the services of Sergeant Parkin have been secured for that purpose, who attends and drills the elder boys of the school in the playground, from 11 to 12 on Monday mornings.

 

Under the head of `Drawing` we have to record the result of the same two examinations as before, viz, The first grade examination of those children of the National School who are instructed for an hour and a half weekly throughout the year in the elements of drawing; and the second grade examination of the members of the Art Night Class, which, though not in any way necessarily connected with our Parish Schools, and so not strictly coming within the scope and limits of our present subjects, yet as conducted and carried on by Mr and Mrs Thebridge, may well be allowed a place here.

 

The first of these examinations took place in the National Schoolroom. On Friday, March the 6th. Sixty-five children were examined-fifty-eight in freehand, and thirteen in model drawing, some few children being presented for examination in both those subjects. The result of this examination was made known in the report received some time afterwards from the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, of which the following is a summary:-

 

1.   A Number of Children who have given satisfaction of having been taught drawing. Boys 29 Girls 28.

2.   Names of children who have shown proficiency or excellence. (Those who have shown Proficiency are marked `P`, and those who have shown Excellence are marked `E`. The latter are entitled to prizes.)

 

Subject of Examination

Name

 

Freehand

Model

Prize

Allison

Alfred

P

 

 

Butler

John

E

 

D. Board

Crisp

Tom

P

 

 

Dobbs

Elizabeth

 

P

 

Martin

Henry W.

E

 

D. Board

Phelps

Martha

 

P

 

Tripp

Mary

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The examination of the members of the Art Night Class also took place in the national Schoolroom, on the evenings of Thursday and Friday, the 30th of April and the 1st of may, and was very successful, as will be seen in the following Report received in due course from the Science and Art Department. This, it should be remembered, was a second grade examination. There were but nine members of the class who presented themselves for examination.

 

It may be here again noted as a subject of much regret that so few avail themselves of the opportunity afforded them by this Art Night Class. There must be many who scarcely know how to `kill` their time during the long winter evenings, to whom the Art Night Class, besides, helping them out of that difficulty, would afford a means of acquiring that which can never be an injury to them, and may prove a most useful and valuable acquisition.

 

But in addition to the Evening Classes,- if a sufficient number could be induced to attend, Mr and Mrs Thebridge, who are both fully certificated, would be very pleased to open a class on Saturday mornings for those who, for evident reasons, cannot attend in the evenings, and would thus bring within the reach of all classes in the parish most of those advantages which are so much valued in connection with Schools of Art in large towns.

 

Names of candidates who have successful. `P` signifies Pass, and `E` Excellent. A candidate obtaining the latter mark is entitled to a prize.

 

 

 

 

 

Subject of examination

Name

 

Free-hand

Per-

spective

Model

Prize

selected

Ashford

Louisa

P

 

 

 

Nation

John

P

 

 

 

Pupil teachers

 

 

 

 

 

Creed

F.G.(Nat. Sch).

P

 

E

Colours

Gale

James (Nat. Sch.)

 

 

P

 

Teacher

 

 

 

 

 

Groom

John B.(Nailsea Par. Sch.)

 

E

 

Colours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The parish was certainly never supplied with a better staff of teachers; their work, which is by no means always easy or always pleasant, is yet always conscientiously and diligently done. And though some may think it unwise to say so much of them least they `should be exalted above measure,` it is certainly more in accordance with the precepts of Scripture thus to give `honour to whom honour is due;` and we may surely trust those who have proved themselves equal to the winning of them, to prove themselves equal also to the wearing of their honours wisely.

 

 

 

Parish Registers.

 

Baptisms

 

1874

Jan 1st Olive Blanche, daughter of Joseph Francis and Harriet Sweet.

18th Edward Albert Parlet, son of Albert and Mary Thompson.

25th James, son of William and Elizabeth Lee.

25th Ernest Charles, son of James and Amelia Allison.

25th George, son of Henry and Elizabeth Mitchell.

Feb 22nd Arthur Oliver, son of Mark and Amelia Coombs.

27th Rose Lily, daughter of John and Sarah Ann Woolford (privately).

Mar 26th Mary Eleanor, daughter of John and Eleanor Stock (privately).

29th Rosina Charlotte, daughter of William and Emma Small.

Apr 4th Florence Augusta, Daughter of John and Sarah Ann Woolford (privately)

7th Emily Anne, daughter of George and Elizabeth Taylor (privately).

8th Mary Anne, daughter of Joseph and Eliza Bannister (privately).

May 31st Edward, son of Edward and Ann Harriett Mitchell.

31st Sarah Ann, daughter of James and Mary Ann Banwell.

June 7th Lilian Ellen, daughter of Samuel and Ellen Eyres.

25th Harriett Ransford, daughter of James and Elizabeth Bargrey (privately).

28th Eva, daughter of John and Sarah Knight.

July 15th Ernest James, son of Lewis and Mary Anne Picton (privately).

Aug 2nd Frances, daughter of Charles and Ann Lowden.

2nd John Henry Charles, son of Charles and Ann Lowden.

25th George, son of James and Elizabeth Nisbett, privately.

25th Frederick John. Son of William and Harriot Bear, privately.

30th Frederick Robert, son of Robert and Ruth Phillips.

30th Sarah Ann, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Ann Fowler.

30th Laura Ellen, daughter of William Henry and Mary Ann Batchelor, privately.

Sept 27th Ethelind Ann, daughter of William and Mary Ann Bessant.

27th Agnes, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Gale.

27th Frederick, son of William and Emma Poole.

Oct 4th Frederick, son of Francis and Harriet Simpkins.

4th Arthur James, son of John and Charlotte Pomphrey.

25th Harvard Austin, son of Henry and Amelia Whatley, Clifton.

25th Agnes, daughter of Samuel and Harriet Brown.

Nov 1st Ernest Walter, son of Henry and Emma Rowe.

11th Florence Waldron, daughter of Gordon and Sarah Montague.

11th Herbert Ellis, daughter of George and Alice Biss.

 

Marriages

Feb 15th Samuel Bond, of Portishead, to Mary Elizabeth Baber, of Portishead.

Apr 8th Henry Allum Sully, of St. Jude`s, London, to Emma Boynton Copeman, The Nore, Portishead.

May 24th Edwin Tucker, Westminster, to Jane Ashford Coombs, Portishead.

June 25th Thomas John Hines, organist of the Parish Church, Portishead to Mary Bryant, Portishead.

July 21st William Henry Edbrooke, Portishead, to Annie Maria Way, Portishead.

Aug 11th William Henry King, Weston-super-Mare, to Sarah Ann Biddle, Portishead.

 

 

Burials

1874

Jan 4th Lillie Davis (of Clevedon), aged 4 years.

22nd Hannah Landman, aged 72 years

Feb 4th Lavinia Ann Harper, of Bristol, aged 38 years.

8th William Miller, aged 55 years.

23rd Mary Davis, aged 32 years.

Mar 8th Florence Beard, aged 11 months.

23rd Mary Hardwick, aged 93 years at Compton Martin.

25th Arthur James Davis, aged 1 year.

29th Ada Helen Weaver, aged 11 months.

30th Mary Eleanor Stock, aged 2 days.

Apr 18th Ada B.W. Hinton, of Coleford, Gloucestershire, aged 3 years.

25th Eliza Walter, aged 44 years.

May 24th Thomas Milsom, aged 31 years. Accidentally drowned at

Cardiff.

June 3rd Amy Harriett Heaven, aged 1 year.

11th Sarah Babb, aged 76 years.

18th Robert Westcott, aged 48 years.

26th James Tanner, aged 83 years. At the Friends` Burial Ground.

30th Samuel John Harris, aged 3 years.

July 14th William Baxter, B.T.S.` Formidable,` aged 12 years.

15th Sarah Coulson, aged 37 years.

Aug 22nd Charles James, aged 39 years.

25th Ellen Elizabeth Jones, aged 12 years.

30th Emma Rowles, aged 8 years.

Sept 3rd Martha May, aged 83 years.

3rd Mary Jane Batchelor, aged 1 year.

20th Martha Lovell, aged 47 years.

28th Susan Cross, aged 1 year.

Oct 7th Charles Kitchen, aged 77 years.

15th Henry Martin, aged 60 years.

Nov. 5th Daniel Price, aged 7 years.

10th Richard Thomas Jones, aged 37 years.

10th George Justice, aged 7 years.

 

 

The Old Burial Register.

 

The last of the burials recorded above is the last entry in the old Burial register; a few facts, therefore, gathered from that book may not be without a degree of melancholy interest for many in the parish.

The book contains the particulars of 800 burials; the first being that of Samuel Lovell, aged 17 years, who was buried on the 26th January, 1813, by `John N. Shipton, A.M. Curate of Portbury-cum-Tickenham; and the last that recorded above. The book therefore, covers a space of nearly 62 years, the average number of burials a year, being 13.

 

With regard to age, 119 out of the 800, population, were infants under 1 year;

118 were between 1 and 10;

62 between 10 and 20;

67 between 20 and 30;

61 between 30 and 40;

48 between 40 and 50;

74 between 50 and 60;

79 between 60 and70;

84 between 70 and 80;

56 between 80 and 90;

8 between 90 and 100;

and one Hannah Baker Bailey; who was buried Nov. 3rd, 1853, by the Rev. R.L.Wolley, is entered as over 100 years.

 

In addition to these, which do not make up the 800, there are 23 entries in which no age is given, 18 of whom were persons whose bodies were cast up on the shore by the tide, of whom there were 21 altogether.

 

 

Church of England Temperance Society.

 

1874 July

 

The public meeting in connection with this Society, promised in the May number of this Magazine, took place in the Lecture Hall, on Monday evening, June 1st, and was very well attended. The Rev. S.J. Ram, travelling secretary to the Society, who had preached twice on its behalf on the previous day, was present, and addressed the meeting.

A resolution, recognising `the wide-spread sin of intemperance to be the fruitful source of poverty, crime, disease, and irreligion`. advocating `the promotion of temperance principles on the basis of the Church Temperance Society,` and pledging the meeting to the formation of a Parochial Society, including two sections, 1, for non-abstainers, and 2, for total abstainers only, was proposed by the Rev. S.J.Ram, seconded by Mr. Weatherly, and carried unanimously.

It was also agreed that `any person wishing to become a member in either section shall purchase the Society`s card of membership, (price1d.) and become a subscriber of 1s. annually, in return for which a copy of the Church Temperance Chronicle will be supplied monthly.` Before the meeting separated seventy-three persons gave in their names as willing to become members of the new Society; viz, 51 as non-abstainers, and 22 as abstainers, and other names have been added since. These were summoned to attend a second meeting in the Infants` Schoolroom, on Friday evening, June 12th, for the purpose of appointing officers and committees, when the following list was proposed and agreed to, viz:

 

President, the Rector (ex officio);

Vice-Presidents, the Revs. R.B.Boyer, W, Jones, and L. Lewis, Messrs. E.C.Daniel, J. Fisher, J.P. F. Weatherly, and G. Wigan, M.D.

 

Committee for Non-abstaining section; Rev. W. Jones, chairman, Mr. G. Gifford, secretary, and Messrs. S. Barton. J. Crane, J. Curtis, S. Dyer,

J. Stewart, H. H. Stoate, and A. Thompson.

 

 

Committee for Total Abstinence section; Rev. R.B. Boyer, chairman, Mr. J.R. Thelbridge, Secretary, and Messrs. R. Barnes, W. Bennett, W. Halliday, John Mayo, Joseph Selvey, jun. S. Thomas, and J.W.Webb.

 

The offices of Treasurer and Secretary were not filled up.

The first step taken by these Committees was to appoint a Sub-Committee to draw up rules, etc. This has been done; and there is now every prospect, therefore, that by the time this July number is in the hands of the parishioners, the Portishead branch of the Church of England Temperance Society will be fully organized, and about to give public notice of its existence by proceeding to the celebration in due form of its first annual festival.

 

It is very desirable, therefore, that all who are willing to join the Society, and aid in its work and efforts in the cause of temperance, should rally round it at once, and so give it all the advantages and prestige which a good start always insures. The two sectional secretaries, Mr. G. Gilford and Mr. Thelbridge, will give any information in their power, and receive the names of any who may wish to join the non-abstaining or total abstinence sections respectively. The declarations on the cards of membership, one of which must be signed by each person who becomes a member of the Society, are as follows:

 

NON-ABSTAINING DECLARATION.

 

`I recognise my duty as a Christian to exert myself (for the suppression of intemperance; and, having hereby become a member of this Society, will do my utmost, both by example and by effort, to promote its objects`.

 

ABSTAINING DECLARATION.

 

`I hereby agree to abstain from the use of alcoholic liquors, except for religious purposes, or under medical order`.

 

 

 

------------------------------

 

 

Aug 1874,

 

More about Temperance.

The first Annual Festival of the Portishead Branch of the Church of England temperance Society was celebrated, as announced, on Tuesday, July 14th, and met with considerable success.

 

The proceedings commenced with a short service in the parish Church, at 4-30 p.m; which was, however, but very thinly attended.

The sermon was preached by the Rev. E.A.Fuller, vicar of St. Barnabas, Ashley Road, Bristol, and one of the Honorary Secretaries of the Bristol, Branch of the Society, who took his text, 1 Cor.xii. 25, 26, `That the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it`.

 

About one hundred and twenty persons sat down to tea in the orchard at the Rectory, where the Committee had made ample provision for them. The surplus of cake, etc, was readily disposed of in the evening, the Committee had no cause to complain of any want of success in connection with this, the first public Tea Meeting held under the auspices of the new Society.

 

The Officers and Committees of the Society, as finally arranged, are as follows:

President .. The Rector.

 

Vice - Presidents

Bowyer, Rev. R.B.

Daniel, Mr. E.C.

Fisher, Mr. J., J.P.

Jones, Rev. W.

Weatherly, Mr. F.

Wigan, Dr.

 

 

Treasurer .. Mr. J. Stewart.

Secretary .. Mr. G. Gifford.

 

General Committee:

 

Heaven, Mr. A.G.

Miller, Mr. J.

Landman, Mr. J.

Long, Mr. J.

Picton, Mr. L.

Roberts, Mr. J.

 

Non-Abstaining Sectional Committee:

 

Jones, Rev. W. (Chairman)

Barton, Mr. S.R. (Secretary)

Bennett, Mr. W.H.

Crane, Mr. J.

Curtis, Mr. J.

Dyer, Mr. S.

Lowick, Mr. T.

Phelps, Mr. T.L.

Thompson, Mr. A.

 

Total Abstinence Sectional Committee:

 

Bowyer, Rev. R.B. (Chairman)

Thelbridge, Mr. J.R. (Secretary)

Barnes, Mr. R.

Bennett, Mr. W.

Halliday, Mr. W.

Mayo, Mr. J.

Selvey, Mr. Joseph, jun.

Thomas, Mr. S.

Webb, Mr. J.W.

 

THE SALE OF WORK AT THE FLOWER SHOW;

 

1874

 

At the annual flower show, fixed for the 12th of August, there will be as usual a sale of work in a tent on the ground, the proceeds of which will be given to defray the debt still remaining on account of the introduction of gas into the Parish Church. Contributions of work for sale are urgently requested from all parishioners and friends.

 

 

 

 

1874 Sept

 

The Flower Show

 

Prizes open to Amateurs or their Gardeners.

 

 

Plants and Flowers.

Best collection of not less than eight ornamental stove or greenhouse plants in or out of bloom.

1st, Mr E. C. Nicholls: 2nd Mr H. H. Townsend; 3rd, Mr J. Fisher.

Twelve stove and greenhouse plants;

1st, Mr E. C. Nicholls; 2nd, Mr J. Fisher.

Six pots of fuchsias;

1st, Mr H. H. Townsend; 2nd Mr J. Fisher.

Six pots of geraniums;

1st Mr H.H.Townsend; 2nd Mr J.Fisher.

Six pots of balsams;

1st, Mr J. Fisher;

Six pots of achimenes;

1st, Mr J. Fisher; 2nd, Mr H. H. Townsend.

Six pots of petunias;

Mr, H. H. Townsend.

Six pots of ferns;

1st, Mr H. H. Townsend; 2nd, Dr. Wigan.

Six pots of mosses;

1st, Dr. Wigan.

Twelve dahlias cut;

1st, Mr A. G. Heaven.

Twelve asters cut;

1st, Mr A. G. Heaven; 2nd, Capt. Ward.

Eight verbenas cut, three trusses of each variety;

1st, Mr A. G. Heaven.

Six gladioli;

1st, Mr A. G. Heaven.

Twelve roses cut;

1st. Capt. Ward; 2nd, Mr R.Philips.

 

Fruit.

Six peaches;

1st Dr. Wigan.

Six nectarines;

1st, Dr. Wigan.

Twelve apples;

1st Mr T. G. Matthews; 2nd, Dr. Wigan.

Twelve pears;

1st, Mr T. G. Matthews; 2nd, Dr. Wigan.

Two melon;

1st; Mr A. G. Heaven; 2nd, Mr J. Roberts.

Black and white grapes; (not less than a 1lb. of each)

1st, Dr. Wigan; 2nd, E. C. Nicholls.

Twelve plums;

1st, Mr A. G. Heaven; 2nd, Mr T. G. Matthews.

 

Vegetables.

An assortment of vegetables; (not less than six)

1st, Dr. Wigan; 2nd, Mr J. Fisher;

Four sticks of celery;

1st Dr. Wigan.

Two cucumbers;

1st, Mr J. Fisher; 2nd Dr. Wigan.

 

Ladies Prizes.

Best table decoration;

Miss Bessy Wigan.

Best bouquet for the hand;

Miss Fanny Wigan.

 

Open to Cottagers.

20 Kidney potatoes;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, George Pocock.

20 early potatoes;

1st, George Stokes; 2nd , Mark Coombs.

Six carrots;

1st, Wm. Brown; 2nd, Mark Coombs.

Six parsnips;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, John Dobbs.

Six turnips;

1st, John Williams; 2nd, T. Wybourne.

Twelve onions;

1st, George Stokes; 2nd, Mark Coombs.

Twelve underground onions;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, Edward Withey.

30 pods of scarlet runner beans;

1st, John Dobbs; 2nd, Thomas Atherton.

30 pods of broad beans;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, John Parsons.

30 pods of peas;

1st. Wm. Brown; 2nd, Benjiman Bliss.

3 out-door cucumbers;

1st. Edward Withey; 2nd, Mark Coombs.

3 vegetable marrows;

1st, Thomas Wybourne; 2nd, John Dobbs.

Bunch of herbs;

1st, Edward Withey; 2nd John Williams.

4 sticks of celery;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, John Dobbs.

Assortment of vegetables;

1st, Mark Coombs.

Red currants;

1st, Edward Withey; 2nd, John Dobbs.

Eight table apples;

1st, James May; 2nd, Edward Withey.

8 culinary apples;

1st, James May; 2nd John Landman.

Eight table pears;

1st, Edward Withey; 2nd, Thomas Wybourne.

Twelve plums;

1st, John Williams; 2nd, Mrs Tippett.

Nosegay of cut flowers;

1st, Mrs Edward Withey; 2nd, Mrs Offer; 3rd, Mrs W. Bryant.

Device in cut flowers;

1st, Mrs Hodges; 2nd Mrs Edward Withey; 3rd, Mrs Offer.

Six flowers in pots;

1st, Thomas Wybourne; 2nd, Mrs Tippett; 3rd, John Dobbs.

Six pots of fuchsias;

1st, George Brown; 2nd, Thomas Wyourne.

Six pots of geraniums;

1st, Mrs Hodges; 2nd, John Brown.

SIx pots of calceolarias;

1st, Mrs Hodges;

Twelve caranations or picotees;

1st, Mrs Hodges; 2nd, Mrs W. Brown.

Nosegay of wild flowers, by children;

1st, Henry Miller; 2nd, Charles Bessant; 3rd, Emily Atherton; 4th, Florence Atherton.

Selection of ferns , by children;

1st, Albert Withey; 2nd, Edward Miller; 3rd, Charles Bessant;

4th, Thomas Brown.

 

Prize to Market Gardeners.

Assortment of vegetables and fruit;

1st, Albert Harding.

 

 

Extra prizes;

Best kept and cultivated cottagers garden;

1st, Mark Coombs; 2nd, Robert Philips; 3rd, George Patch.

 

Autumn sown onions;

1st, John Ash; 2nd, John Landman.

Lettice;

1st, Edward Withey.

Lillium Auratum;

1st, Mr A.G.Heaven.

 

 

School Examinations, Inspections, and Reports.

 

1876

 

The Examination Season, as it may be not inappropriately called, commenced at Portishead this year with the visit of the Diocesan Inspector, the Rev. W. Mitchell, who examined St. Barnabas` School on Tuesday, Feb. 22nd, and the National School and the Infants School on the following day. If the general result of all the examinations and inspections may be again said to be highly satisfactory, and creditable alike to the teachers and the taught, this first series of them was by no means an exception to the rule-as the following reports will most fully prove. And it is remembered that it is with by far the most important branch of education, instruction in religious knowledge, that Mr. Mitchell is commissioned to deal, this one consideration alone will lend additional importance to his reports, and render them so much the more satisfactory.

 

Of St. Barnabas` School, Mr. Mitchell says in his report received on the 18th of March:

 

`This school may now be reported as in thorough working order, The children answered very creditably throughout. Their repetition was good in quantity and quality. Tone and discipline excellent`.

 

Of the National School he also reports as follows:-

 

`Class III. `Answered generally well.`

Class II. `Some very well, but others but moderately. Differences. The class having lost its teacher since Christmas, the master has taken them to make up for this`.

 

Class I. `As in previous years,- proofs of steady. Vigorous teaching throughout, with many intelligent answers on the work, prepared and excellent illustrations from the rest of the Scripture.

The work, as a whole, deserving of high praise.`

 

And of the Infant`s School, as shortly as sweetly,-

 

`Excellent in all respects. Repetition of Scripture very accurate and distinct.`

 

Accompanying each of these reports, Mr. Mitchell also again sent a table (fully explained in the Parish Magazine two years ago. (1874 p.15.)

 

March 6th The annual examination in elementary drawing in which those children of the National School who have been taught drawing had an opportunity afforded them of showing on the one hand the ability and efficiency with which they had been taught, and on the other hand, the amount of attention they had themselves paid to and the measure of profit they had received from that teaching.

This examination was conducted by the Managers in the usual manner. Papers sent down under seal from London by the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education were given to and worked by the children in the school-room, and then immediately sealed up again and returned to the department to be examined and classified according to a regular system. The result of this examination was that out of 75 children examined, 45 are stated to have `given satisfactory evidence of having been taught drawing` merely, while 28 more are named as having shown either `proficiency` or `excellence` in one or more of the subjects in which they were examined, as will be seen in the accompanying table, in which those who have shown `proficiency` are marked `P`, and those who have shown ` excellence` are marked `E` the latter being entitled to prizes.

 

 

Subject of examinations

Name

Free-

hand

Geo

metry

Model

Prize

Anstice, Emily

 

P

 

 

Bessant, Samuel

 

P

 

 

Borham, Mary

P

 

 

 

Cobley, Henry

 

 

P

 

Creed,Edwin

E

 

 

 

Crisp, Alice M

P

 

 

 

Crisp, Ralph

 

 

E

 

Dobbs, Emma

 

 

E

 

Gale, Amelia

 

P

 

 

Gale, Arthur

 

 

P

 

Hunter, Emma

P

 

 

 

Hodges, William

 

P

 

 

Knight, Alice

P

 

 

 

Mayo, Mary Ann

 

 

P

 

Mitchell, Annie

P

 

 

 

Offer, Fanny

P

 

 

 

Parkin, George

P

 

 

 

Parkman, Alfred

 

P

 

 

Parkman,Wm. John

P

P

 

 

Pyne, Henry

E

 

 

 

Selvey, Florence L

 

P

 

 

Smith, Emma

 

 

P

 

Spiller, Frederick

P

 

 

 

Sprules, Matilda

 

 

E

 

Williams, Ernest

P

E

 

 

Young, John

P

 

 

 

2nd Grade

 

 

 

 

Phelps, Martha

 

 

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before passing on it may here be noted as a subject of special regret that the Art Night Class, which had been conducted by Mr Thelbridge with so much success for several winters, had to be given up last winter, chiefly because it was so thinly attended. And this seems only the more to be regretted when taken in connection with the fact that again last year, as the year before, Mr Thelbridge was awarded by the Lords of the Committee of Council on Education a gratuity of 5 as the master of one of the `Art Night Classes in which the general amount of work, as tested by examinations, and having regard to the number of students taught in each class, was most satisfactory`.

 

The Annual Government Inspections took place as usual in the early part of May; the Rev. H.B.Barry visiting the National and Infant`s Schools, while St. Barnabas` School was this year examined by a newly appointed Inspector, Mr. Wix. The following summary of the Inspector`s Report in each case was received by the Managers in due course.

 

National School

 

`The school is under good influence, the children seem interested in their lessons, and the progress made is on the whole satisfactory. The work, however, of the second and third standards wants attention. More maps are required`.

 

Infants School

 

The school is orderly, taught with care and kindness, and making satisfactory progress`.

 

St. Barnabas` School

 

`The school is in very good order and seems well-taught throughout; there is some deficiency in the spelling and in the arithmetic of the fourth standards; the arithmetic otherwise was very good, and the Grammar and geography very fair`.

 

That our schools, though not without their weak points, are yet on the whole in a highly satisfactory condition, and making good progress in secular as well as in religious instruction, may be gathered not merely from the wording of these reports, but much more plainly and correctly from the amount of the Grant, in each case considerably larger than last year, as follows:-

 

--s--d

National School 1096--0

Infants School 463--0

St. Barnabas` School 29--0--0

1849--0

 

In the case of the Infants` School the total amount of Grant due on the results of the examination was 60 2s. which, however was reduced by the Education Department to 46 3s, the sum given above, the total amount of Grant paid to any school not being allowed to exceed half the total expenses of that school during the previous year. There is but little encouragement to economy in this, certainly; though it is satisfactory to have shown that a school may be managed economically without in any degree sacrificing its efficiency.

 

The examination in connection with the Diocesan Prize Scheme, together with its results, as far as our schools are concerned, now alone remains to be noticed. This examination took place this year on a Friday (May 19th), instead of, as always before, on a Saturday. This was one decided improvement, but still St. Barnabas` School was again weighted with the very serious drawback that it had to face this examination on the very next day after its examination by the Government Inspector, while the National School also again had the two to go through in the same week. When competing with other schools in which these two examinations are perhaps six months apart, our schools are plainly placed at a very considerable disadvantage. Most difficulties, however, may be overcome; and it adds much to the credit of our schools that even under these circumstances each took for itself the place it did,- the National School carrying off the second district prize for schools under a master; and St. Barnabas` School the second district prize for schools under a mistress.

 

These prizes, justly enough, fell to the lot of the teachers (upon whom through out the year falls also `the burden and heat of the day`), and consisted in each case of a present of books from the Bishop, to which was added a gratuity of 2 from the funds of the Chew Decanal School- masters Union.

 

 

National School

No. Of Marks

No.

Div.

Name

 

Scrip.

Cat.

Total

Result

1

B

Emily Anstice

 

28

51

79

Pass

2

"

Mary Ann Atherton

 

50

56

106

1st Class

3

"

Maria Nisbett

 

27

23

50

Pass

4

"

Fanny Offer

 

96

87

183

1st Class

and

Prize

5

"

Fanny Phelps

 

56

52

108

1st Class

6

"

Alice Knight

 

26

19

45

Pass

7

"

Amelia Gale

 

42

36

78

Pass

8

"

Albert Lesser

 

32

30

62

Pass

9

"

Wm. John Parkman

 

16

25

41

Pass

10

"

Temperance Gale

 

19

41

60

Pass

11

C

Ellen Patch

 

30

44

74

Pass

12

"

Emma Hunter

 

27

39

66

Pass

13

"

Emma Smith

 

38

73

111

1st Class

14

"

Matilda Sprules

 

45

66

111

1st Class

15

"

Martha Phelps

 

56

92

148

1st Class

16

"

John Brining

 

27

43

70

Pass

17

"

Florence Selvey

 

29

34

68

Pass

18

"

William Hodges

 

32

39

71

Pass

19

"

Edwin Creed

 

26

38

64

Pass

20

"

Ernest Williams

 

30

57

87

Comnd.

21

D

Mary Ann Mayo

 

33

42

75

Pass

22

"

Rosina Brooks

 

42

30

72

Pass

23

"

Tom Crisp

 

54

26

80

Comnd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year

App.

Pupil Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

3rd

Fred. George Creed

 

73

35

108

Comnd.

2

4th

Florence R. Dando

 

95

33

128

1st Class

3

5th

Elizabeth Smith (Infant School)

 

70

43

113

Comnd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Barnabas` School

No. of Marks

No

Div.

Names

Scrip.

Cat.

Total

Results

1

A

James Brining

65

20

85

Comnd.

2

B

Rosa Pomphrey

24

36

60

Pass

3

"

Lucy Vowles

33

31

64

Pass

4

"

Fanny Wood

29

26

55

Pass

5

C

Martha Garratt

6

20

26

 

6

 

Ellen Davey

36

19

55

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But there were prizes open to pupil-teachers and to scholars as well as to teachers; and of those Florence R. Dando, as taking a First Class, received a book under the Diocesan Prize Scheme, and a 10s. from the Chew Decanal School-masters` Union; while Elizabeth Smith and F.G. Creed, as each `commended,` received a certificate to that effect, and a present of 5s.

Amongst scholars, Fanny Offer again won for herself and for her school much credit-getting the highest number of marks in her division through out the Diocese,-for which she received a Prize book under the Diocesan prize Scheme and would also receive 10s. from the Decanal Union, but having won the same prize last year she was consequently disqualified. Martha Phelps also took a very high place in her division, missing a prize under the Diocesan Prize Scheme for a similar reason, and receiving an Honorary Certificate instead. These two, together with four others,-Emma Smith, Matilda Sprules, Fanny Phelps, and Mary Ann Atherton, gained the honour of a `First Class` in their respective divisions; while not a single child in the National School, and only one in St. Barnabas` School failed to secure the number of marks necessary for a `Pass`, as will be seen from the accompanying tables.

 

It is thus manifest that there is ground for a very high degree of satisfaction to all concerned in connection with the present state of our Parish Schools. By their means parents may secure for their children, at a cost of at most a few pence per week, an education that will abundantly fit them for any post within their reach, as far as this world is concerned; and, what is of infinitely greater importance, that knowledge by which alone they can hope to escape the worst evils of this life, and secure the highest happiness in the life to come.

 

 

 

 

Parish Registers

 

1875-1876

Baptisms

 

1875

Oct 31st Frederick James, son of John and Sarah Woolford.

" 31st William James, son of James and Mary Ann Barrey.

" 31st Reece, son of David and Mary Ann John.

Nov 3rd Elizabeth, daughter of John and Eleanor Stock. (privately.)

17th William Orlando, son of William Orlando and Amelia Joanna Churches.

17th Lucy Eliza, daughter of Henry and Maria Smith. (privately.)

22nd Thomas. Son of William and Ann Staddon. (privately.)

26th Lucy Cecilia Knighton, daughter of Thomas and Lucy Anne Bosanquet. (privately)

28th Ethel, daughter of James and Amelia Allison.

28th Charles Henry, son of John and Sarah Boreham.

28th Arthur Edward, son of George and Eliza Elizabeth Parker.

28th Florence Mary, daughter of George and Eliza Elizabeth Parker.

Dec 25th Arthur, son of James and Eliza Wybourne.

26th Harry James, son of George and Sarah Ann Broad.

26th William Richard, son of William and Sarah J. Earle.

26th Emily Bertha, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Rossiter.

26th Frederick George Richard, son of Charles George and Charlotte Gibbs.

26th Bessie Ann, daughter of Thomas and Amelia Pocock.

26th Ernest Abel, son of James and Annie Jane Josephine Hider.

1876

Jan 13th Alfred, son of John and Elizabeth Rogers. (privately.)

18th Alice Jane, daughter of Robert and Jane Blake. (privately.)

20th Arthur Thomas, son of Albert and Ellen Lodder. (privately.)

25th William Samuel, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Ann Fowler, (privately.)

30th Robert, son of Richard and Elizabeth Gill.

30th Harry, son of George and Mary Martin.

30th Francis Emily, daughter of William and Mary Ann Tripp.

Feb 23rd Charlotte Eliza, Daughter of Charlotte and George Summers. (privately.)

25th Adeline Elizabeth, daughter of Albert and Catherine Jane Beard. (privately).

27th Florence Mary Anna, daughter of John and Mary Jane Flowers.

27th Frederick William, son of John and Mary Jane Flowers.

Mar 5th Mary Augusta, daughter of John Francis Ranald and Elizabeth Amina Daniel. (privately).

5th Emily, daughter of Samuel and Mary Jane Hunt.

7th William, son of William and Mary Jane Kersalake.(privately).

17th Cecil Arthur, son of Arthur George and Jane Heaven.

22nd Martha Jane, daughter of Samuel and Jane Gillard. (privately).

26th Emily, daughter of Thomas Larner and Eliza Phelps.

26th William Charles, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Robinson.

Apr 6th Corisande Emily, daughter of James and Emily Davis.

23rd Amy Harriet Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and Mary Ann Martin. (privately).

30th Walter Edward, son of Henry and Sarah Ann Babbage.

30th William Henry, son of Thomas and Maria Warren.

May 3rd Edward Joseph Cornelius, son of George and Alice Biss.

7th Albert Edwin, son of Albert and Mary Fowler.

18th Louisa Caroline, daughter of Joseph and Albertina Christina Mills.

18th Lillian, daughter of Joseph and Albertina Christina Mills.

19th Mary, daughter of John and Jane Giggs.(privately).

28th Lily Agnes, daughter of William amd Louisa Durbin.

28th Alice Louisa, daughter of Henry Joseph and Elizabeth Hannam.

28th Walter Edward, son of Walter James and Mary Parker.

28th Jessie Kate, daughter of Walter James and Mary Parker.

28th John Francis, son of John and Sarah Dawe.

June 6th Percy, son of Thomas and Emma Price.(privately).

13th William, son of George and Elizabeth Taylor. (privately).

25th Oliver Alexander, son of Alexander and Mary Ann Palmer.

25th Herbert George, son of Mark and Amelia Coombs.

25th Herbert Henry, son of Robert Mason and Ellen Inglis.

25th Henry, son of Samuel and Amelia West.

28th Annie Evelyn, daughter of John and Jemima Quantick.

28th John Edward, son of Thomas and Jane Bowden.

28th Walter James, son of Thomas and Jane Bowden.

28th Eliza Maria, daughter of Thomas and Jane Bowden.

28th George Henry, son of Thomas and Jane Bowden.

Jul 2nd William Henry Smith, son of John and Elizabeth Williams.

14th Alice Helen Louisa, daughter of James Albert and Louisa Kimber. (privately.).

21st Fitz-Stephen Henry, son of George Henry and Louisa Corisande Bridges, of Woodside, Portishead.

30th Sydney George, son of Samuel and Jane Harris.

30th William Charles Jones, son of Robert and Sarah Vaughan.

Aug 13th Ellen Charlotte, daughter of Nelson Wellington and Ellen Esther Summers.

20th Elizabeth, daughter of John and Jane Cannard. (privately).

6th Beatrice Alice, daughter of John and Charlotte Pomphrey.

27th Robert James, son of Robert and Elizabeth Parr.

31st James, son of Eli and Mary Hayman. (privately).

Sep 6th Dora Blanche, daughter of William and Emily Tuck.

8th Laura Louisa, daughter of Philip George Arthur and Anna Maria Young.(privately).

24th Albert Charles, son of Joseph John and Sarah Eliza Ware.

24th Ada Mary Selina, daughter of James and Selina Uncles.

Oct 1st Annie Maud Mary, daughter of George Tovey and Ann Bindon.

12th Dora Gertrude Laura Eckersley, daughter of Charles Eckersley and Ann Daniel.

29th Edith Jane, daughter of John and Jane Lodder.

29th Albert Thomas, son of Thomas and Rhoda Blake.

29th Kimber, son of Walter and Mary Dinham.

29th Alice Eliza, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Hancock.

Nov 11th George Mathew, son of John and Ann Brown.

 

Marriages

 

1875

Nov 7th John Talbot of Portishead, to Emily Poole, of Hankerton, Wilts.

9th Walter William Bennett, of Roath, Cardiff, to Evangeline Selvey, of Portishead.

9th At the Friends` Meeting House, Alexander Dawes, of Portishead, to Emily Jane Barton, of Portishead.

Dec 23rd Henry Oldland, of Stoke Bishop, to Katherine Septima Hopper, of Portishead.

25th Edwin Wyatt, of Portishead, to Mary Anne Cottle, of Portishead.

1876

Jan 2nd Joseph Mitchell, of Portishead, to Matilda Martin, of Portishead.

Mar 26th Isaac Hudson of Portishead, to Mary Joy of Portishead.

May 1st Charles Stone of Portishead, to Sophia Brown of Portishead.

June 7th Charles Hodges, of Portishead, to Harriet Gallaway, of Portishead.

July 18th Thomas Murray Harding, of Clifton, to Mary Margetts, Portishead.

Aug 3rd Samuel Brown to Mary Spiller, both of Portishead.

8th Frank Foster Sprules to Emily Ann Membery, both of Portishead.

21st Walter Milton Richards to Emily Jane Halliday, both of

Portishead.

Sep 12th William Trott, of Yarcombe, Devon. To Lucy Adams, of Portishead.

 

Burials

1875

 

Oct 26th Alberta Mary Thompson, Capnor Cottage, aged 3 years.

Nov 7th Elizabeth Stock, aged 6 days.

28th Thomas Staddon, aged 2 years.

Dec 2nd Mary H. Bridges, Woodside, aged 10 months.

3rd Mary Ann Knight, aged 73 years.

15th Maria Butler, aged 76 years.

17th Sophia Jane de Rougemont, of Cheltenham, aged 42 years.

18th Frederick J. Garrett, aged 30 years.

18th Mary Pyne, aged 42 years.

22nd Ann Walter, aged 74 years.

1876

Jan 16th Arthur Wybourne, aged 3 weeks.

19th William Paynter, aged 1 year and 8 months.

27th Arthur Thomas Lodder, aged 5 weeks.

Feb 6th Harry Cooling, aged 18 years.

20th John Henry Fowler, aged 17 months.

Mar 5th William Richard Earle, aged 3 months.

8th Mary Augusta Daniel, aged 2 weeks.

17th William Kerslake, aged 3 weeks.

16th Adeline Elizabeth Beard, aged 7 months.

25th Elizabeth Baster of Devizes, aged 47 years.

Apr 6th At Corfe, near Taunton, Martha Ann Behrends, aged 89 years.

7th At Portbury, James Chiswell, aged 55 years.

21st William Jewell, aged 18 years.

26th Amy Harriet Elizabeth Martin, aged 12 weeks.

May 10th Matilda Beatrice Whatley, aged 7 months.

10th Martha J. Gillard, aged 8 weeks.

Jun 7th Ellen Thomas, aged 30 years.

15th Alice Brown, aged 3 years.

15th Thomas Maylam. B.T.S.`Formidable,` aged 11 years.

18th William Taylor, aged 15 hours.

July 4th Julia Miriam Yabbicom, aged 33 years.

21st John Ashford Williams, aged 62 years.

28th John Mayo, aged 59 years.

30th John Chapman, aged 56 years.

Aug 25th Elizabeth Cannard, aged 5 days.

Sep 3rd Florence.M.Harris, aged 3 years

5th James Hayman, aged 11 days.

10th George Henry Williams, aged 3 years.

13th Emily Hunt, aged 9 months.

15th Rose Maud Redwood, aged 4 months.

15th Laura Louisa Young, aged 7 weeks.

21st Arthur Henry Beard, aged 2 years.

Oct 4th Edward Elliott, aged 21 years.

5th Mary Ann Cole, aged 17 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Flower Show

 

1876 September

 

The thirteenth annual exhibition in connection with the Portishead Horticultural and Floral Society was held on Wednesday, Aug 23rd, in the field that has been now so often kindly lent for the occasion by Mr. J.Fisher. The show was thus spoken of in the `Daily Bristol Times` and `Mirror,` of the following day:-

 

`In their schedules the committee say `the exhibition has for its special object the encouragement of the cottagers residing in the parish of Portishead in the cultivation of their gardens, and to foster the moral influence of such like avocations;` and , judging from the improvement manifested at each succeeding show, the promoters may be congratulated on the success which has attended their efforts. The amount offered for prizes this year was larger than ever, being nearly 90, and the entries were consequently much more numerous than last year. Generally speaking, the show was of a very superior character. The amateur classes were especially well filled, and many of the exhibits were very valuable and rich. The display of wild flowers very creditable indeed. It is hardly to be wondered at that the show of roots and vegetables produce was neither very large nor very fine, for the season has been most unfavourable, and the same observation is heard almost every where. There was, however, a very fair choice of fruit, and some of it was very choice.` The judges were Messrs. Dodds (Bishopstone), Morse (gardener to Mr Proctor Baker), and Walters (gardener to Mrs Gibbs, of Tyntesfield). The following was the

 

Prize List

 

Amateurs Residing in the Parish of Portishead.

 

Best collection of 8 ornamental stove or greenhouse plants, in or out of bloom;

1st Prize Mr J. Fisher; 2nd Dr. Wigan; 3rd Mr H.H. Townsend.

For the best 12 stove or greenhouse plants;

1st Dr. Wigan; 2nd Mr J. Fisher.

 

Ladies Prizes, open to Ladies of Portishead only;

 

For the best stand of flowers (or flowers and fruit combined) for table decoration;

1st Miss B. Wigan

For the best bouquet for the hand; Miss Holland.

 

Amateurs or their Gardeners residing in Portishead;

Flowers;

Pots of fuchsias;

1st Mr H.H. Townsend; 2nd Mr J. Fisher.

Pots of Geraniums;

1st Mr H.H. Townsend; 2nd Mr J. Fisher;

Pots of balsams;

1st Mr Fisher;

Pots of achimenes;

1st Mr H.H.Townsend; 2nd Mr W.H.Arthur;

Pots of petunias;

1st Mr H.H. Townsend; 2nd Mr J. Fisher;

Pots of ferns;

1st Dr. Wigan 2nd Mr H.H.Townsend;

Pots of mosses;

1st Mr W.H.Arthur; 2nd Dr. Wigan;

Asters;

1st Mr J Fisher and Rev. J. Arkell;

Verbenas;

1st Mr W.H. Arthur; 2nd Mr A.G.Heaven;

Roses;

1st Mr G. Gilford.

 

Fruit

Peaches;

1st Dr. Wigan;

Apples;

1st Miss Norman; 2nd Mr A.G. Heaven;

Pears;

1st Miss Norman; 2nd Mr Geo. Corner;

Melons;

1st Mr. W.H. Arthur; 2nd Dr. Wigan;

Grapes; (white and black

1st Dr. Wigan; and Mr J. Fisher; (equal)

Grapes; (pot)

1st Mr George Corner;

Plums;

1st Mr A.G. Heaven; 2nd Dr.Wigan.

 

Vegetables;

 

Vegetables; (assortment)

1st Mr J. Fisher; 2nd Dr. Wigan; 3rd Mr J.Davis;

Celery;

1st Dr. Wigan; 2nd Mr H.Townsend;

Cucumbers;

1st Mr. George Corner; 2nd Mr J.Fisher;

Potatoes;

2nd Mr H.H. Townsend;

Spring Onions;

1st Mr. Arthur; 2nd Miss Norman; highly commended, Mr Townsend;

 

 

For Cottagers residing in the Parish of Portishead

 

Vegetables;

 

Kidney potatoes;

1st Mark Coombs; 2nd W. Brown;

Early potatoes of any sort;

1st George Pocock; 2nd James Speed;

Carrots;

1st Wm. Brown; 2nd John Brown;

Parsnips;

1st John Brown; 2nd Mark Coombs;

Cabbages;

1st John Parsons; 2nd Mark Coombs;

Turnips;

1st Mark Coombs; 2nd Charles Speed;

Spring onion;

1st M.Coombs; 2nd John Brown;

Beans (scarlet runners)

1st John Brown, 2nd S. Hartree;

Dwarf beans;

1st George Stokes; 2nd Wm. Brown;

Broad beans;

1st George Brown 2nd Charles Speed;

Peas;

1st George Stokes; 2nd Mark Coombs;

Cucumbers; (out doors)

1st Edward Withey; 2nd John Dobbs;

Vegetable marrows;

1st Wm. Brown; 2nd John Dobbs;

Bunch of herbs;

1st Edward Withey; 2nd Mark Coombs;

Celery;

1st Mark Coombs; 2nd John Dobbs;

Assortment of vegetables; (not less than six sorts)

1st Mark Coombs; 2nd John Dobbs;

 

Fruit

 

Blackcurrants;

2nd Mark Coombs;

Redcurrants;

1st Edward Withey; 2nd John Dobbs;

Dessert apples;

1st E.Withey; 2nd S.Hartree;

Culinary apples;

1st George Pocock; 2nd John Dobbs;

Table pear;

1st George Pocock; 2nd E. Withey;

Plums;

1st John Dobbs;2nd T. Wybourn;

 

Flowers

 

Nosegays of cut flowers;

1st Ellen Cooling; 2nd Mrs Withey;

Devices of cut flowers;

1st Mrs Withey; 2nd George Tippett;

Flowers in pots; (six)

1st Mr. W. Bryant; 2nd John Dobbs; 3rd George Tippets;

Geraniums;(six)

1st George Stokes 2nd Mrs W. Bryant;

Calceolarias; (six)

2nd Mr Withey;

Nosegays of wild flowers;

1st Minna Hartree; 2nd Alice Knight; 3rd Lewis Bessant; 4th James Speed;

Selection of ferns;

1st Thomas Brown; 2nd Albert Withey; 3rd Henry Miller; 4th Andrew Knight;

 

Market gardeners.

 

An assortment of vegetables and fruit.

2nd prize; Albert Harding;

 

Extra Prizes.

 

Prizes open to all Amateurs;

For the best collection of not less than nine ornamental stove or greenhouse plants, in or out of bloom;

1st prize, Mr C. Gardiner, Brislintgon; 2nd Mr J.W.Miles, Kingsweston.

For the best group of collection, growing or cut, or both, of flowers, such group not to occupy a space of more than three feet by two;

1st Mrs Wigan; 2nd Mr George Corner;

For the best six tricolour geraniums, in or out of bloom;

1st Mr W. H. Arthur;

For the best bouquet or stand of flowers, not flowered under glass;

1st Mr Virgo; 2nd Mrs Heaven; 3rd Miss F. Wigan;

For the best table decoration in wild flowers, open to ladies;

1st Mrs Virgo; 2nd Miss Bessie Wigan;

For the best collection of not less than six sorts of fruits;

1st Mr J.H.Virgo; 2nd Dr.Wigan;

For the best twelve cut roses, of twelve distinct and named varieties; Open to all amateurs of Somersetshire;

1st Mr S. B.Ward; 2nd Mr James Arthur;

For the best twelve French asters, cut flowers;

1st Mr James Arthur;

 

Prizes open to all cottagers

 

Best basket or tray of vegetables, not less than six sorts;

1st Mark Coombs; 2nd A. Gooding; 3rd Mary Atherton;

Best basket or tray of fruit, not less than six sorts;

1st E.Withey; 2nd Jos. Virgo; 3rd Albert Harding;

Best twelve caranations or picotees, cut flowers, from same garden;

1st George Brown; 2nd William Brown;

Best nosegay of cut flowers, from same garden;

1st Esther Virgo; 2nd Mary Atherton; 3rd T. Shepstone.

 

 

Winter Entertainments given by the Portishead Harmonic Society, During the season of 1875-76.

 

 

Paid s d

 

Mr. Hines (Hire of Piano) 5 0 0

Mr. Jarrett (Printing) 9 4 0

Mr. Poole (Bill Posting) 10 0

Mr. Hines (Music) 7 14 5

Lecture Hall Company 6 11 6

Mr. Bennett Sen. (Platform, etc) 2 0 0

Mrs James (Lemonade) 1 8

Mr Edbrooke and Mr Bannister 4 10 0

Mr Picton (for Cambric) 5 7

Mrs Potter, etc. 1 0 0

Beds and Breakfast for two 13 6

Paper, stamps, etc. 5 0

37 15 9

 

 

 

 

Received s d

October Tuesday 7 17 3

Friday 1 14 0

November Tuesday 7 15 6

Friday I 15 4

December Tuesday 6 19 6

Friday 16 6

January Tuesday 8 3 6

Friday 17 6

February Tuesday 7 8 0

Friday 19 6

March Tuesday 6 3 0

Friday 2 0 6

May Tuesday 12 5 6

Friday 1 15 9

66 11 4

Subscriptions from Harmonium Class 2 10 0

69    1 4

37 15 9

31 5 7

 

Of the total balance in hand, amounting to 31 5s 7d, it has been decided to hand over 20 to Mr. Hines, Organist at the parish Church, by way of remuneration for the professional services he has rendered during the Entertainments; after which 11 8s 7d will remain to be applied as the General Committee of the Portishead Branch of the Church of England Temperance Society may decide, in accordance with the arrangement and understanding under which the Winter Entertainments were first inaugurated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Inspections and Reports.

 

Sept 1878

 

Although the result of the examination in connection with the Diocesan Prize Scheme has not yet been made known and must be published in a later number of this Magazine, the reports of the Diocesan and Government Inspectors have been duly received, and are given below;

 

The Diocesan Inspector, the Rev. W. Mitchell, paid his annual visit to the schools on Wednesday, February 20th; and the following reports were received from him on March 7th. It is gratifying to observe that they are again highly satisfactory, the change of Teachers at St. Barnabas` School being sufficient to account for the deficiency pointed out in a portion of that school.

 

National School; `Conducted, as of old, with remarkable vigour and success. The youngest group, a large class, answered this year, as they have always done here, readily and intelligently. Children in this stage are very apt to fall behind. The rest did mostly very well, the twenty in Standard IV, being a little less ready to write and to answer than the rest. Written work generally very good; a great deal done, with much variety (especially of hymns and collects)` and accurately. The syllabus thoroughly mastered. Excellent discipline and tone`.

 

Infants School; `A general appearance of cheerfulness, readiness, intelligence, and order, very pleasant to the visitors eye and mind.`

 

St.Barnabas` School; `Infants a little behind. They are overshadowed by the older children taught with them. The higher group answered, wrote, and repeated hymns, catechism, and Holy Scripture, very satisfactory. Good tone and discipline.`

 

Summing up the various points on which, in tables accompanying these reports, the Inspector expressed a distinct and separate opinion, and placing the results in the case of the three schools in one sum, it will be interesting and satisfactory to find that in fifty-three cases that opinion was very good; in nine, good; in five, fair; in two, moderate; and in none, bad.

The annual Government Inspection, was conducted again by the Rev. H. B. Barry, in the month of May. The following summary of his report in each case was received in due course.

 

National School; `The discipline wants attention. Very fair general progress has been made, but the spelling and arithmetic admit of improvement. The room has been enlarged and improved`.

 

Infants School; `The infants are in excellent order and carefully taught. A new box of colours is wanted`.

 

St. Barnabas` School; `The reading is very fair; but, both in discipline and attainments, the school has suffered from changes of Teachers. More books are wanted`.

 

It should be remembered that when Mr Barry paid his visit to St. Barnabas` School there had been two changes of Teachers there in the course of three months.

 

The total amount of grant awarded and received in each case was as follows: viz;

 

s d

National School 120 - 13 - 0

St. Barnabas` School 31 - 5 - 0

Infants School 66 - 10 - 0

Total 218 - 8 - 0

 

The National School underwent its annual examination in elementary drawing in the beginning of March. This examination was conducted in the way prescribed by the Science and Art Department of the committee of Council on Education, as explained in this Magazine on previous occasions. In addition to the names appearing in these tables, fifty-five others are reported to have `shown satisfactory evidence of having been taught drawing`.

 

First Grade

Subject of Examination

Name

Free

hand

Geo

metry

Model

Prize

Ashford, Joseph

 

E

 

Compasses

Borham, Joseph

 

P

 

 

Brining, James

 

P

 

 

Cobley, William

 

P

 

 

Crisp, Alice M

 

P

 

 

Derrick, Joseph H

 

E

 

Compasses

Dobbs, Isaac

 

P

 

 

Flowers, Agnes

 

E

 

Compasses

Gale, Amelia

 

 

P

 

Gale, Temperance

 

 

P

 

Hodges, William

E

 

P

Draw: Board

Inglis, John

P

 

P

 

Lowden, John H

 

P

 

 

Marsh, Thomas

P

P

 

 

Osborn, Alfred J

P

P

 

Parkin, George

 

E

Compasses

Parkin, John

 

P

 

 

Phillips, Minnie

 

 

 

 

Poole, Henry

P

 

 

 

Price, Caroline

 

 

P

 

Pyne, Lionel V

 

P

 

 

Selvey, Albert

 

P

 

 

Selvey, Arthur

 

 

P

 

Speed. George

P

 

 

 

Tripp, Edwin

 

 

P

 

Watkins, Herbert

E

 

P

Draw: Board

Watkins, Whaley

 

P

 

 

Williams, Edith

 

 

P

 

Williams, Herbert E

P

 

P

 

Wilmot, Alfred

P

E

 

Compasses

Wyatt, Charles

P

 

E

Colours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Grade

Subject of examination

Name

Geometry

Model

Prize

Paid Monitor

 

 

Offer, Fanny

E

 

Books

Pupil Teachers

 

 

 

Drake, Arthur E

E

 

Books

Sprules, Matilda

P

P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 1878

 

The accompanying tables will show the results of the annual Examination in connection with the Diocesan Prize Scheme as far as the Schools of this parish are concerned. This Examination took place as usual on the third Friday in May-May 17th,- and was conducted precisely as described in connection with former occasions. In estimating the general result, and the amount of credit which our Schools have earned for themselves in connection with it, it should be borne in mind, in the first place, that while there are upwards of 520 schools of all kinds in the Diocese, only 152 were represented in this Examination. And while, perhaps, it would not be fair or safe to conclude that these 152 are in every case better than the remaining 368, it may safely be presumed that such is the case in a vast majority of instances. The competing Schools may in short be fairly considered as the picked Schools of the Diocese,-a fact which should be always remembered when considering the place assigned to any one School in connection with the Examination.

 

These 152 competing Schools are further divided, for the purposes of this Examination, into three Grades. Grade `A` comprises all the competing Schools which have more than sixty children on the books over eight years of age. Grade `B` includes those Schools which have more than thirty, and less than sixty; and Grade `C` those which have less than thirty of such children on their books. By this means only those Schools which have something like an equal number of children on their books, and therefore something like an equal amount of work to do, though still necessarily greatly differing in advantages and disadvantages according to varying local circumstances, are grouped and compared together. And when, therefore it is found that out of forty-eight competing School in Group `A` our National School is assigned the fourteenth place, it must be acknowledged that the result is highly creditable to all connected with it. And although St. Barnabas` School occupies a considerably lower place in Group `B`,- being twenty-eighth out of forty-three-yet, considering that this School has had to undergo twice in one year the drawbacks inseparable from a change of Teachers, this results also is on no account to be despised.

 

Turning now from these general results to note the success of individuals, it is highly creditable that out of the three Pupil-teachers at the National School, two (Arthur E. Drake and Matilda Sprules) are placed in the First Class, and the third, F.G.Creed, commended; for which success the two former received a prize of books from the Bishop of the Diocese. Fanny Offer has again maintained the position she has repeatedly secured for herself at the head of her contemporaries in the Diocese, having again taken the prize and first place among all the paid monitors in the Diocese under fourteen years of age. Amongst the children selected to complete in this Examination on behalf of the National School, Herbert Williams, in Division `B`, and Mary Ann Atherton, in Division `C` have won for themselves the distinction of being placed in the First Class.

 

In connection with the competition for the Needlework prizes offered by the Chew Decanal Schoolmasters` Union, this School also stands well this year. Out of seven specimens of work sent in for competition, three obtained `First Class` three were `commended`, and the remaining one `passed`. And in a special competition for prizes for the

Best made shirt sleeves, out of five girls from this School who competed, two (Matilda Sprules and Amelia Gale) were awarded a `First Class,` with a gratuity of 5s. each, and two more (Mary Dyer and Fanny Phelps) were `commended`, and received each 2s-6d.

 

It should also be stated that Rosina Brooks, Pupil-teacher at the Infants` School, was `commended` as the result of her Examination in connection with the Prize Scheme.

 

Before concluding, the writer of these words desires to express for himself (and he feels sure that he is in full accord on this point with all the other Managers of the Parish Schools) his sincere thanks to all the Chief Teachers of the Schools for their loyal and hearty co-operation with him in everything that has been considered of importance to the Schools under their charge, and his deep sense of the valuable services they have rendered to the parish in the important positions which they thus severally occupy.

J.A.

 

National School No. of Marks.

Scripture Total

Div

Age

Name

O.T.

N.T.

Cat`.

 

Result

B

10

Thomas Marsh

11

6

22

39

Failure

"

11

George Parkin

15

2

18

35

Failure

"

11

Alfred Wilmott

40

12

13

65

Pass

"

10

Alfred Osbourn

38

22

22

82

Comn.

"

11

Charles Wyatt

27

16

46

89

Comn.

"

11

Herbert Williams

50

7

55

112

1st Class

"

11

Charles Clifford

8

7

27

42

Pass

"

11

John C. Sowden

27

14

21

62

Pass

"

11

Arthur Hunt

33

9

36

78

Pass

"

11

Joseph Borham

8

4

26

38

Pass

"

11

James Brining

35

19

30

84

Comn.

"

11

Frederick Lloyd

11

0

10

21

Failure

"

10

Eliza Moore

18

6

30

54

Pass

"

11

Harriet Mayo

11

11

57

79

Pass

"

11

Clara Lovell

12

8

35

55

Pass

"

11

Agnes Flower

28

24

26

78

Pass

"

11

Martha J. Atherton

13

8

52

73

Pass

"

11

Lionel V. Pyne

39

9

31

79

Pass

C

12

William Cobley

16

28

10

54

Pass

"

12

Joseph Derrick

12

26

11

49

Pass

"

12

Albert Lesser

36

25

21

82

Comn.

"

13

Edith Williams

22

19

12

53

Pass

"

12

Alice Crisp

27

25

22

74

Pass

"

13

Fanny Phelps

32

26

36

94

Comn.

"

13

Temperance Gale

24

25

22

71

Pass

"

13

Mary Ann Atherton

40

32

37

109

1st Class

"

12

Amelia Gale

19

26

29

74

Pass

"

12

Mary Dyer

17

22

16

55

Pass

D

15

Emma Hunter

27

23

29

79

Pass

"

14

William Hodges

30

17

29

76

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Barnabas` School No. of Marks.

Scripture Total

Div

Age

Name

O.T.

N.T.

Cat`.

 

Result

B

11

Kate Pomphrey

4

3

10

17

Failure

"

11

Sarah Foster

18

14

16

48

Pass

C

13

Ellen Davey

21

33

19

73

Pass

"

13

Rosa Pomphrey

15

22

14

51

Pass

"

13

Lucy Vowles

21

20

14

55

Pass

"

12

Lucy Stokes

14

16

13

43

Pass

"

13

Eva Adams

5

8

7

20

Failure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupil-Teacher and Paid Monitors

No. of Marks

Year of Scripture Total

Appr.

Age

Name

O.T.

N.T.

Cat`.

 

Result

 

 

National School

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

Fanny Offer

53

45

72

170

1stClass;Prize.

 

15

Matilda Sprules

6

3

38

101

1st Class

 

17

Arthur E. Drake

 

 

115

1st Class

 

18

Fred. G.Creed

 

 

 

124

Comnd.

 

 

St. Barnabas`

 

 

 

 

 

1st

16

Mary Ann Mayo

4

9

27

76

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parish Registers

 

Baptisms

 

1877

Dec 23rd Edith, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Gill.

23rd Ada Jane, daughter of Hugh John and Sarah Corner.

23rd Mary Jane, daughter of John and Mary Jane Wolfe.

23rd Walter William, son of William and Martha Brown.

23rd Frederick Charles, son of Arthur and Emily Sophia Treffry.

26th Eleanor Stewart, daughter of James George and Eliza Shaw Stewart.

1878

Jan 2nd Edwin Albert, son of Azariel King and Mary Chapple.

6th Arthur Samuel, son of Samuel and Sarah Jane Hunt.

13th Kate, daughter of John Henry and Charlotte Osmond.

27th Rowland, son of James and Amelia Allison.

27th Ernest John Offer, son of Henry and Sophia Bartley.

27th Frederick, son of William and Sarah Earle.

Feb 4th William, son of Henry and Eliza Milson. (privately).

6th Thomas William, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Wilkins.(privately).

18th Joseph, son of William and Jane Tapp. (privately).

20th Mabel Jessie, daughter of John and Mary Parsons.(privately).

24th Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Harris.

24th Charlotte, daughter of John and Mary Gillard.

24th Ada Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander and Mary Ann Palmer.

24th Mary Anna, daughter of Elijah James and Ellen House.

24th Thomas, son of Thomas and Rebecca Jenner.

24th Emily Agnes, daughter of Joseph John and Sarah Eliza Ware.

26th Ellen Kate Harriet, daughter of Robert Mason and Eleanor Inglis. (privately).

27th Frederick, son of Henry and Martha Fry. (privately).

Mar 3rd Ellen Florence, daughter of John and Annie Wensley.

8th James, son of James and Lucy Dolbear. (privately).

31st William, son of William and Mary Jane Kerslake.

31st Mary, daughter of William and Mary Jane Kerslake.

31st Emily Maria, daughter of Joseph and Maria Bishop.

31st Emma Elizabeth Alice, daughter of George and Charlotte Summers.

31st Howard Francis, son of William and Mary Tripp.

April 7th William George Lawrence, son of John Chorley and Phoebe Emma Harvey.

7th Charles, son of Charles and Ann Tripp.

14th Percy Walter, son of Charles and Emma Boulter.

16th Alice Frances, daughter of John and Ann Woolford.(privately).

18th Mary Jane, daughter of John and Jane Needs (privately).

22nd Charles William, son of Nelson Wellington and Ellen Hester Summers.

28th Stepen Herbert, son of Stephen and Emma Bessant.

28th Louisa Kate, daughter of Samuel and Jane Harris.

28th John Edward Charles, son of Albert and Mary Elizabeth Fowler.

28th William Lewis, son of Samuel and Bertha Alice Duncan.

28th Frederick Robert, son of William and Mary Ann Cridland.

28th Elizabeth Jane, daughter of James and Mary Perrott.

May 19th Charles Leigh, son of Charles Henry and Margaret Amelia Kerry. (privately).

Jun 6th Arthur Stanley, son of Lewis and Mary Ann Picton. (privately).

30th Albert Edward Henry Way, son of William Henry and Annie Maria Edbrooke.

30th Helen Mary Elizabeth, daughter of John and Louisa Davis.

July 7th Philip John, son of Philip George Arthur and Anna Maria Young.(privately).

28th Corisande Emily, daughter of Frederick and Anna Pick.

28th Alfred Henry, son of Tobias and Elizabeth Ann Butler.

28th John Henry, son of Edward and Ellen Holloway.

30th Elsie Mary Wintle, daughter of James and Emily Davis.

Aug 24th May Adelaide, daughter of Albert and Mary Thompson.

25th Frederick Charles Burt, son of Seth and Eliza Jane Colborne.

25th Frank, son of Albert and Adelaide Stone.

25th Emily Eva, daughter of Walter William and Evangeline Bennett.

Sep 16th Ellen, daughter of William and Ellen Hancock. (privately).

28th William John, son of John and Selina Rowe.

29th Edward Francis, son of William and Ann Davis.

29th Charles John, son of Henry and Elizabeth Rossiter.

29th Bessie Florence, daughter of Frederick George and Ellen Howell.

29th William George, son of George and Georgina Sage.

29th Florence Mary Ann, daughter of Edward and Kate Cottey.

29th Frederick James, son of Issac and Mary Hudson.

29th Winnifred Daisy Sinclair, daughter of Arthur and Maria Fleming.

Oct 2nd Roland, son of William and Mary Tuck.

2nd William, son of Robert and Eliza Jarman.

 

Marriages

 

1877

Dec 17th John Blackmore to Eliza Smith.

23rd James Cogswell Turner to Ann Guard.

1878

Apr 24th George Harry Searl, of Stockton-on-Tees, to Sarah Jane Sprules, of Portishead.

May 30th Arthur William Robbins, of Portishead, to Elizabeth Davis, of Portishead.

June 13th William Buckland, of Matherne, Monmouthshire, to Louisa Octavia Vowles.

 

 

 

 

Burials

 

1877

 

Dec 19th Jane Lovell, aged 77 years.

23rd Ellen Earle, aged 60 years.

1878

Jan 5th Marie Price, aged 8 years.

12th George Clifford, aged 35 years

14th Albert Pitman, B.T.S. `Formidable`, aged 12 years.

25th Elizabeth Davis, aged 85 years.

Feb 4th Emily Jenkins, aged 15 months.

9th Emily Nuttall Stoate, aged 53 years.

17th Thomas William Wilkins, aged 2 months.

24th Lily Agnes Durbin, aged 21 months.

Mar 3rd Mabel Jessie Parsons, aged 6 weeks.

10th Alice Chaplin, aged 7 months.

14th Elizabeth Mattack Fry, of Clifton, aged 73 years.

17th James Dolbear, aged 7 weeks.

17th Hannah Collins, aged 70 years.

17th Joseph Tapp, aged 18 months.

24th Ann Pugh, aged 60 years.

Apr 2nd Guy Lawrence Hinton, aged 17 months.

16th John Samuel Stock, aged 17 months.

22nd John Atherwin Coles, aged 11 months.

26th Eleanor Cann, aged 80 years.

May 2nd Harriot Wraith, aged 70 years.

12th Elizabeth Saunders, aged 34 years.

21st Charles McDermot, B.T.S. `Formidable`, aged 14 years.

30th Elizabeth Wybourne, aged 80 years.

Jun 22nd Elizabeth Chilcot, aged 82 years.

22nd Charles Whatley, aged 73 years.

July 10th Philip John Young, aged 2 days.

Aug 12th Samuel Young, aged 61 years.

15th Percy Walter Boulter, aged 4 months.

Sep 18th Elizabeth A. Daniel, aged 44 years.

27th Florence Ida Nation, aged 4 years.

Oct 2nd William John Rowe, aged 17 months.

16th Mary Chiswell, aged 41years.

 

 

 

 

The writer of the Portishead Magazine the Rev. John Arkell left Portishead in September 1878. He writes from Oxford, in his farewell letter that appeared in the October issue.

______________________________